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CAESES provides comprehensive functionality for propeller and fan designers so that it can be used as an expert blade design software. post-8-0-94135500-1484667951_thumb.png

 

Basically, any kind of propeller blade (e.g. boat propeller, aircraft propeller, blowers, fans etc.) for any application can be created with it. CAESES focuses on the variable geometry of blades for design explorations and shape optimization (mostly, together with CFD). Here is a screenshot for an axial blade design, taken from one of the samples that are shipped with CAESES: post-8-0-09843100-1491576961_thumb.png

 

For general information about modeling of propellers, see the MARINE SECTION. For other rotating machines, please see the TURBOMACHINERY SECTION.

 

  • 2D PROFILES
    2D profiles can be defined by the user. These can be either parametric (e.g. camber curve + thickness distribution) or based on profile data from an air foil data base. There are models available with special definitions such as Wageningen B-Series. NACA curves are also available in CAESES via the menu > curves > naca. When generating the 3D propeller surface, the profile parameters can be changed by means of radial functions for each 2D parameter (e.g. chord, camber, thickness).
     
  • IMPORT AND EXPORT
    In order to import or export the blade in a proprietary format, feature definitions can be used which allows you cope with e.g. company-specific ASCII formats. The PFF (Propeller Free Format) is directly supported.
     
  • EXTERNAL TOOL / CFD AUTOMATION
    Any preliminary design tool (XFOIL etc) or even CFD packages (in-house, open source, commercial) can be integrated so that a new design can be analyzed within CAESES.
     
  • BLADE ANALYSIS
    There is a functionality that can analyze an imported blade surface (given as NURBS) to give you the chord, rake, skew, pitch, thickness and camber distributions.
     
  • CUSTOMIZATION
    There is a lot of scripting possible in CAESES so that any specialized design process can be fully transferred into the platform. For instance, if you use Excel sheets for your profile definitions, you can access them through CAESES but also re-implement your methods using the feature definition programming editor.
     
  • EXAMPLES
    Some propeller design case studies can be found in this section. If you are interested in drone design, then check out this post here.
     

Here are some videos - the last one I put there only to give you an impression about how the geometry controls can be wrapped and accessed for applying changes, this can be done for all other types of blades as well.

 

 

 

ONLINE TOOL

 

Finally, check out the new online geometry creator for the Wageningen B-Seriespost-8-0-61760000-1517387625_thumb.png

 

  • Browser-based, intuitive web app.
  • Allows you to generate typical B-Series propellers with just a few clicks.
  • Requires very little propeller design expertise.
  • The final geometry can be downloaded as STL or STEP file.

 

 

 

LAST UPDATE JANUARY 2018

 

 

Note that there are FULL FREE ACADEMIC versions of the pro edition CAESES for students and PhD students as well as trial licenses with variable time frames. There are also special editions for small companies, start-ups and freelancers.

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We have three different options for blade design:

  • Generic Blade: Mostly for maritime applications (the blade uses the terms rake, skew and pitch)
  • Cylindrical Transformation: Generalized blade design where you have to design the 2D profile in the xy-plane (x is mapped to r*theta and y is mapped to z).
  • Stream Section: For general turbomachinery blades where the stream surface is not necessarily a cylinder.

Cheers

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If you are interested in creating your own parametric profile definition and connect it to an existing propeller.

Check the linked topic.

 

Propeller Design: How to create and replace an existing parametric 2D profile

 

http://www.friendship-systems.com/forum/index.php?/topic/176-propeller-design-how-to-create-and-replace-a-2d-profile-definition/

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Guest Mr. Thor Andersen

Hi. 

I was wondering if anyone had any experience designing a tip or rim driven impeller using CAESES

I am going to work with this in my thesis and I am currently doing research on what software options I have. 

 

Best regards 

Thor Andersen

Student at Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering at Chalmers.

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Hi Thor,

 

Based on the propeller setup in the samples, you can very easily generate the geometry, even though some details are missing, like fillets etc. However, this only took a few minutes.

 

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ToDo:

1. delete the propeller,

2. adopt the functions for full chord length at tip, thickness distribution etc.

3. create a periodic image from the blade

4. generate a profile for the shrout or whatever casing you want to have and use a surface of revolution from that profile.

 

The file is attached, have fun

Claus

impeller.fdb

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Check out these propeller-related blog posts:

 

 

The blade analysis is a great helper tool for quickly adjusting a propeller design according to some imported blade geometry ("from a dead geometry to a smart parametric model in just a few seconds").

 

I hope you'll like it...

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If you are interested in creating your own parametric profile definition and connect it to an existing propeller.

Check the linked topic.

 

Propeller Design: How to create and replace an existing parametric 2D profile

 

http://www.friendship-systems.com/forum/index.php?/topic/176-propeller-design-how-to-create-and-replace-a-2d-profile-definition/

Hello Mr.Karsten,

 

Can i design my own propeller in CAESES? i mean if i have the propeller data. Can you give some guide how to design in CAESES?

Thanks a lot.

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Hi, that's a NACA series, as far as I remember. BTW: Note that the propeller tip feature is not limited to a specific propeller series.

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I have to look it up, but probably this was a demo case with a NACA 66 profile (not modified). We also have a B-series propeller model (Wageningen). Just in case this is also of interest.

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Hey guys, just joined in hopes I could hire someone to help create an impeller for a new jet-powered surfboard I'm building. I will be honest, I don't have time to learn the software and hoping if I can provide some specs to someone they could pop out an impeller cad file for me to test. Ideally, it would be great to have a couple small variations to an impeller to test different pitch.

 

Is anyone interested in helping out?

Email me please: Chris@TheTechnicalTraders.com

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Seems like CAESES is no longer free software? Only a two week trial is available for non-students? I have a (very) custom geometry propeller I would like to simulate, but I'm certain that two weeks is much too little time to get acquainted with the software and start running simulations that have the kind of accuracy I'm looking for, seeing as the project I am working on is a hobby, and hot a full time job (unfortunately). Is there a way to extend the trial period beyond the two weeks?

 

Best regards,

​Misha

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In the online propeller geometry tool , what airfoil series is used for the blade sections?

 

B-Series

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Hi Suraj,

 

The CAESES project file of the Wageningen propeller model is available for customers with a commercial CAESES license.

 

Best regards

Joerg

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