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Jörg

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About Jörg

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  1. CAESES is used for the parametric design of axial fans and similar turbomachinery products, mostly in the context of simulation-driven shape optimization. In particular, CAESES is used if you need robust variable geometry models for automated studies. The comprehensive CAD modeling capabilities are geared towards simulation and give fan designers full flexibility (no black box, customization possibilities). More information about turbomachinery design software can be found here. I have also attached a few animations that were generated in CAESES. The design variables of the axial fan model were varied automatically using the integrated variation methods. Note that this is a rather simple model which is also shipped with the software. It can be used as a reference design to set up custom models. The hub and shroud modeling is demonstrated, as well as the 2D-3D mapping of the cylindrical sections and some Boolean Operations to cut the blade at the tip and merge it with the hub. The fillet size can also be controlled by a parameter. If needed, you could also automatically derive the periodic flow domain for automated meshing with grid generation tools or CFD packages.
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    CAESES Blog

    Please visit our blog on the CAESES website where I regularly post updates, news and other stories: GO TO CAESES BLOG
  3. Here is a recent article about turbine wheel optimization where the blades and the scallops can be optimized at the same time within a fully-automated process. Such a "complete" and variable model allows you to consider the aerodynamic performance (CFD) and the stress characteristics of each generated design. Comes with a set of nice animations.
  4. When you select code in a feature definition, you can choose to create a reusable code snippet . This snippet can then be edited and accessed for re-use through the menu of the definition editor .
  5. Hi, Please find attached a feature definition that you can use for exporting blades into the geomturbo file format. Note that this export will be included in one of the next CAESES releases (menu > feature definitions > tools). If you need it right now: Just put the definition into the feature user directory (e.g. C:\Users\name\AppData\Roaming\friendship\features) to directly access it through the menu in CAESES. Cheers Joerg PS: Check also this related post for importing geomturbo files, as well as our company blog post about this topic. GeomTurboExport.fdf
  6. Hi together, If your projects gets opened veeery slowly, then one reason for this could be hidden result tables They have been closed, but they are not directly visible in the GUI, only through the menu. We've seen projects with huge sets of hidden result tables. In future CAESES versions, you will get asked whether you want to close or (this is new!) remove a result table. This will hopefully avoid that one simply closes and forget about a result table. We'll see... Hope this helps... Joerg
  7. Hi together, With version 3.1, you have the additional skinning option for meta surfaces. This allows you to have a low number of generating cross sections (curves in surface direction) while matching given boundary curves, also called rails. See the attachment for a simple example. In former versions, one solution to approximately match such boundaries has been to increase the number of cross sections - which is expensive and increases the data of the resulting NURBS surface. Here, this new skinning method is a good alternative to the existing auto-cubic point interpolation. Finally, when it comes to the new BRep type that also comes with version 3.1, it is even recommended to exactly match boundaries for further processing such as Boolean Operations and fillet modeling. Cheers Joerg metasurface_skinning.fdb
  8. Hi together, The pro edition of CAESES comes with a set of algorithms for design exploration and formal optimizations. However, people often already use an external optimization software in their company (such as HEEDS, Isight, modeFrontier, Optimus, optiSLang etc). In this case, one can make use of the batch mode of the CAESES pro edition, in order to automatically generate geometry design variants, using the given optimization tool. I attached a small setup (sweepbatch.zip) which demonstrates how simple this works: sweep.fdb Project file that contains the geometry model along with its design variables.sweep.fsc ASCII file that controls the batch run. It starts CAESES, sets the values of the design variables and exports an STL file. This fsc-file is the one that needs to be manipulated by the external optimization software, i.e. parameterize the values of the design variables (see the "setValue"-command).run.bat Run this file to execute the entire process. The run of sweep.fdb also writes out the number of open edges into a file called "openedges.dat". It is merely a simple check for a closed STL geometry, and this information can be used as well by the optimization tool (geometry validity check). Cheers Joerg PS: check out this related post as well. UPDATE AUGUST 2017: The call in the bat/script file needs to be "C:\Program Files (x86)\FRIENDSHIP-SYSTEMS\CAESES\bin\win64\CAESES_crt.exe" sweep.fsc with the newer versions of CAESES (and not CAESES-FFW). sweepbatch.zip
  9. Hi together, With CAESES, we also focus on the design and optimization of volute geometries. There is a volute section on the CAESES website. Students and PhD students can get a free academic edition of the pro version - the product page gives more information about this. Basically, the software allows you to create robust parametric volute designs for manual/automated design explorations and shape optimization with CFD. In most cases, the volutes in CAESES are tailor-made models, i.e. you can fully customize the geometry design: Arbitrary parametric cross-section definitions, e.g. based on your area (A) and center of area (=>R) specificationsUse of point data for creating a volute surfaceUser-defined A/R functions (bsplines, mathematical functions)Individual tongue modeling with additional parameters for more detailed design studies and fine-tuningAnalysis and control of inlet/outlet area distributions. Usually, our CAESES support team helps you in setting up customized models, either through the helpdesk or, for more complex models and a quick solution, by means of a customer project. See the attachments for some pictures and animations (e.g. the A/R function gets varied as well as the tongue shape). Cheers Joerg LAST UPDATE: FEBRUARY 2017
  10. Hi together, There have been several questions about impeller and pump design with CAESES which is the reason for putting together the following brief summary: CAESES is used by several major pump makers (KSB, Ebara, Grundfos, DMW), mostly in the context of impeller and volute/casing optimization. In the context of turbocharger design, CAESES is used by e.g. MTU (large Diesel engines) for compressor and turbine optimization. There are free academic versions of the CAESES pro edition for students and PhD students as well as trial licenses, plus special editions for small companies, start-ups and freelancers. COMPARISON TO OTHER TOOLS Compared to other design tools on the market, CAESES focuses on automated design studies with your simulation tools. In most cases, there is already some sort of a baseline design that needs further optimization. Based on this design, a parametric CAESES model is created and automated. The possibilities for customization and shape fine-tuning are massive, so that specialized (company-specific) design processes can be completely defined in CAESES. No black box models etc. This is one important key issue, i.e., flexibility and full customization - besides the fact of having a 100% robust variable geometry for automated processes. IMPELLER BLADES There is functionality for creating parametric impeller blades (meridional contour definition, mapping from 2D onto 3D stream surfaces), which can also include analysis and optimization of the channel areas etc. See the turbomachinery section for more details. A water pump is described in this blog post. Any type of impeller can be parameterized, including complex shapes such as turbine scallops. VOLUTES Here is an overview with some animations. Basically, CAESES focuses on robust modeling of any volute type (in particular: turbochargers, pumps). Design constraints can also be built into the model, as well as typical controls (A/R distribution etc). The more complex your volute is, and the more problems you have to create new design candidates (automated), the more you should consider trying out CAESES. CFD AUTOMATION CAESES users also integrate their CFD and preliminary design tools. With this, a new design candidate can immediately be analyzed, directly within the CAESES GUI. Any open source, in-house or commercial tool can be coupled. You just need a batch mode for these tools. Excel sheets can also be accessed. For CFD analysis, the flow domain can be directly derived from the parametric impeller geometry. There is a CAESES ACT app available, to integrate CAESES into the ANSYS Workbench and to run optimizations with e.g. OptiSLang. MORE MATERIAL I recommend to browse through this page. Please find also attached a related presentation from the FRIENDSHIP SYSTEMS Users' Meeting 2013. I also added some related pics and animations. Unfortunately, it is not that easy to show more material since most data is confidential. Anyway, I hope this post helps a bit in terms of a quick overview. Cheers Joerg LAST UPDATE JULY 2019 UM2013-07-klemm-diffuser-design-for-multistage-pumps-with-FFW.pdf
  11. Hi together, If you want to change the rotational direction of a propeller blade (type FGenericBlade), then you can simply switch the orientation. See the attachment for more information. Cheers Joerg
  12. Hi together, Please find attached a parametric model of a centrifugal impeller which was built in CAESES. The project file will probably also be included in version 3.0.11. Note that pretty much everything can be customized in this model and used for manual or automated blade design, such as: Merdional contour (i.e. hub and shroud contour)Profile shape by means of user-defined thickness distributions and beta-angle distributionsFillet shape at the hub region by using a constant factor (BTW: this can also be varied with a function along the blade)Ellipse factor of leading edgeSize of tip gapRotational directionNumber of bladesThickness of casing The splitter blade is completely decoupled from the main blade in terms of the beta-distribution (so this gives more freedom) - but can be linked to the main blade, too. In addition, the model comes with some support geometries for meshing/CFD ("periodic boundaries"). These are automatically adjusted to the blade shapes. The camber lines of the blades are generated from the trailing edge which makes it easier to vary the beta distributions (e.g. fix the TE ends of the blades). There is also a feature definition included which generates the camber line with the leading edge as starting point. When working with the model, switch off all scopes that are "downstream" of where you currently manipulate things. For instance, if you want to change the hub and shroud contour, then set the scopes 02_main, 03_splitter and 04_cake invisible. If you want to change the beta distributions, only visualize the sections that are given in 00_sections. This allows interactive changes to the model with a very short response time. You can also switch off the cake part since it is only there for visualization purposes and CFD pre-processing. Let me know what you think about the model (of course, I hope you'll like it....). Cheers Joerg UPDATE AUGUST 2015: There are new samples directly included in CAESES that you can use for impeller modeling. See my more recent post below. The project files in the attachment do not work correctly for CAESES 4.x versions, we now have much easier ways to design and control hub fillets. UPDATE FEBRUARY 2016: I removed the old project file and added an updated CAESES model to this post. Should work with versions >= 4.0.3. UPDATE FEBRUARY 2017: Note that there are now FULL FREE ACADEMIC versions of the pro edition CAESES for students and PhD students as well as trial licenses with variable time frames. There are also special editions for small companies, start-ups and freelancers. FS_CENTRIFUGAL_IMPELLER.pdf turbocharger_easyuse.fdb
  13. Hi together, Please note that CAESES can be utilized as an OpenFOAM GUI (Graphical User Interface). There are free academic versions of the CAESES pro edition for students and PhD students as well as trial licenses with flexible time frames. There are also special editions for small companies, start-ups and freelancers. Compared to other tools in the market, CAESES is good at automation, i.e. if you already have an existing OpenFOAM setup and you want to analyze design variants of your product, then CAESES might be a perfect choice. Especially, if geometry variation plays a major role. In contrast to that, a tool such as HELYX-OS might be a better choice e.g. if you would like to set up an OpenFOAM case from scratch. Here are some CAESES-specific offers: Conveniently configure and manipulate template files (e.g. controlDict or any other ASCII file) in the GUIChange your geometry design and trigger OpenFOAM with a single mouse-click for analysis (i.e. streamline your design process / automation)Use your individual result values such as pressure loss or homogeneity for an objective function in design studies and shape optimizationsPostprocess your simulation data (streamlines, contour plots etc) Here is a video that shows some of the features in CAESES. Cheers Joerg LAST UPDATE FEBRUARY 2018
  14. CAESES provides comprehensive functionality for propeller and fan designers so that it can be used as an expert blade design software. Basically, any kind of propeller blade (e.g. boat propeller, aircraft propeller, blowers, fans etc.) for any application can be created with it. CAESES focuses on the variable geometry of blades for design explorations and shape optimization (mostly, together with CFD). Here is a screenshot for an axial blade design, taken from one of the samples that are shipped with CAESES: For general information about modeling of propellers, see the MARINE SECTION. For other rotating machines, please see the TURBOMACHINERY SECTION. 2D PROFILES 2D profiles can be defined by the user. These can be either parametric (e.g. camber curve + thickness distribution) or based on profile data from an air foil data base. There are models available with special definitions such as Wageningen B-Series. NACA curves are also available in CAESES via the menu > curves > naca. When generating the 3D propeller surface, the profile parameters can be changed by means of radial functions for each 2D parameter (e.g. chord, camber, thickness). IMPORT AND EXPORT In order to import or export the blade in a proprietary format, feature definitions can be used which allows you cope with e.g. company-specific ASCII formats. The PFF (Propeller Free Format) is directly supported. EXTERNAL TOOL / CFD AUTOMATION Any preliminary design tool (XFOIL etc) or even CFD packages (in-house, open source, commercial) can be integrated so that a new design can be analyzed within CAESES. BLADE ANALYSIS There is a functionality that can analyze an imported blade surface (given as NURBS) to give you the chord, rake, skew, pitch, thickness and camber distributions. CUSTOMIZATION There is a lot of scripting possible in CAESES so that any specialized design process can be fully transferred into the platform. For instance, if you use Excel sheets for your profile definitions, you can access them through CAESES but also re-implement your methods using the feature definition programming editor. EXAMPLES Some propeller design case studies can be found in this section. If you are interested in drone design, then check out this post here. Here are some videos - the last one I put there only to give you an impression about how the geometry controls can be wrapped and accessed for applying changes, this can be done for all other types of blades as well. Wageningen Propeller ModelPropellerBlade Tip DesignGeometry Changes for an Axial Fan (and a Ship Hull) - Demo Video ONLINE TOOL Finally, check out the new online geometry creator for the Wageningen B-Series. Browser-based, intuitive web app.Allows you to generate typical B-Series propellers with just a few clicks.Requires very little propeller design expertise.The final geometry can be downloaded as STL or STEP file. LAST UPDATE JANUARY 2018 Note that there are FULL FREE ACADEMIC versions of the pro edition CAESES for students and PhD students as well as trial licenses with variable time frames. There are also special editions for small companies, start-ups and freelancers.
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